NBCAM – Celebrities with Breast Cancer

I found the following photo gallery on MSN and thought I would post about it here.  For many people celebreties are untouchable, but looking through the pictures it is pretty obvious that they are not.

I will admit that it is scary for me.  I never paid much attention to celebreties, but I have to say to see so many in one place that had been diagnosed with breast cancer scares to shit out of me.

Follow this link to see what celebreties have been diagnosed.

Warriors for the Cause

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2 Comments

Filed under Breast Cancer, Cancer, Health, Illness

2 responses to “NBCAM – Celebrities with Breast Cancer

  1. That is a sad story Elf! I am so sorry about the loss of your friend. A similar thing happened with my first step mother. She didn’t have BC, she had lung cancer, but in less than a year it went to her bones and she died as well. I was 15 and loved her more than my mother.

    It is ok to be selfish in this sense. I am sure that her family feels the same way, especially her precious little girl.

    *hugs*

  2. I lost a dear friend to breast cancer; she lived next door to me too, so we were very close, almost like sisters. She was only 32 years old when she died, and I helped nurse her during her illness.

    Breast cancer is an extremely cruel disease. I watched a beautiful, vibrant, vivacious woman turn into a shell of endless pain and suffering before my eyes. By the time she died, she was no longer even recognizable as the same person. She was in so much pain that she had to be kept drugged to the point that she didn’t even know where she was anymore.

    Carol had originally been diagnosed in her 20s with the most common form of breast cancer (infiltrating ductal carcinoma). She underwent a radical mastectomy, and was warned to never get pregnant because her cancer was sensitive to female hormones. There was no way for the doctors to know whether they had gotten the cancer before it had spread, after all, and it only takes one errant cell to start a recurrence.

    Unfortunately, she did get pregnant by accident. She had not remembered what the doctors said about pregnancy until it was too late, which tells me they didn’t stress it enough. In fact, I asked her if they had recommended tubal ligation, and she said she no.

    By the time her daughter was born, unbeknownst to her the cancer was already at Stage IV, and as seen on her bone scans, had literally spread from her skull to her feet. Yet she didn’t even realize she was sick until it was far too late to save her.

    She first realized something was very wrong when she suffered terrible pain in her hip within a week of giving birth, which did not improve. Almost overnight, she was so sick that the doctors immediately recognized that she had cancer. She underwent experimental treatments at the National Cancer Institute, but she knew she had a zero percent chance of survival.

    When she died, her daughter was not yet one year old.

    However, one of the drugs which was tested on her is now approved to prevent recurrence of breast cancer.

    It is Carol’s legacy that, every day, untold numbers of women are able to live productive and healthy cancer-free lives, due to her unselfish contributions to medical science.

    I realize this is extremely selfish, but I’d rather have my friend.